Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Tying Peg's and Matt's Midge

Once all the trees have shed their leaves we're pretty much down to fishing midges and tiny blue-winged olives when trout are rising.  The blue-winged olive hatches we encounter are not widespread, but midges can be found hatching on just about very trout stream throughout the fall and winter months.  In these two tying videos, Tim Flagler shows us how he ties two different midge dry fly patterns that will imitate the tiny midges you may see over the next few months.      




Tim and I will be tying together at the International Fly Tying Symposium this weekend.  Hope to see you there.

8 comments:

ben said...

I quite like the second midge pattern. I'll have to tie a few up.

Anonymous said...

How about a new post!!!

Mr. Q said...

Yeah, hows about a new post....

Anonymous said...

Post something already

Fly Fishing Sara said...

The second pattern works great! One of my favorites actually. Tried it all over the US and even in Europe and it was pretty successful every time.

you know who!!!! said...

I'm getting very bored, please post something new, did you stop fishing and tying, the holidays are no excuse, neither is a job, get to work Grobert!!!!!

Brad Basehore said...

I do not know if you know the history of pegs midge,but she was from Neville,pa. And fished big spring creek almost daily. Her husband would ty these flies to her specifications. The sz. 26 is what stopped A lot of fisherman from using it. She would often fish by herself with her little dog. The thing that was funny is peg was was very good at catching the difficult trout of big spring with her little,most male fishermen would stop fishing to watch peg school them in the fine art of midge fishing.

Kevin Fleeman said...

More people are have in here who are don't know well about tying peg's and matt's midge. So i think this good page for them to learn more information about this education and i hope they must be enjoy the work so more.